Getting Your Puppy

Getting Your Puppy

The safest way for you to obtain a puppy is to find a reputable breeder. This is also the case even if you are not looking for a show specimen or a top contender in field work. The novice breeders and pet owners who advertise at attractive prices in the local newspapers are probably kind enough towards their dogs, but perhaps they do not have the expertise or facilities to successfully raise these dogs. A insufficient diet can cause indigestion, weak bones, rickets, poor teeth and other problems. The colour of the Lab you choose, is strictly a matter of personal choice. While no importance is placed on colour in the breed, only the three colours - yellow, black and chocolate - are recognised as true Labradors.

There should be two important documents your breeder should give to you, and these are the Health Certificate and registration papers. The breeder should register the litter and each pup with AKC ( American Kennel Club)  and it is necessary for you to have all the paperwork if you plan on showing or breeding in the future. It is best that you know the breeder's intentions on which type of registration they will obtain for your puppy. There are limited registrations which may prohibit the dog from being shown or from competing in non-conformation trials such as Working or Agility if the breeder feels that the pup is not of sufficient quality to do so. There is also a type of registration that will permit the dog in non-conformation competition only.



Your breeder should always be available for you, before and after you receive your puppy. They should be a reliable source of help as you and your puppy adjust to life together. By visiting litters in action you will be able to get a firsthand look as the puppy 'pack' and get to know what each of the pup's individual personality is like, you might have found a particular one that appeals to you. If you haven't found the puppy of your dreams, observe other pups in other litters, as this will help you learn and recognise certain behaviour, which will give you a good indication as to the personality of the pup. Some pups may be leaders, some less outgoing, some may be confident, others shy, playful, friendly, aggressive, etc.,

When you finally acquire your new puppy, he or she should be examined by your vet as soon as you buy him or her. Your vet will be able as well as start your puppy on a vaccination programme. Your home should also have been prepared for your new puppy's arrival. Anything potentially dangerous should be moved out of reach.